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The Whistleblower: Film by Ukrainian about Sex Slavery
04-04-2014, 05:42 PM
Post: #1
The Whistleblower: Film by Ukrainian about Sex Slavery
From our visual arts forum I found this good review:

The Whistleblower: Film by Ukrainian about Sex Slavery


by Lisa Kondracki

http://whiteheritage.org/showthread.php?tid=63&pid=76&mode=threaded
http://www.whiteheritage.org/ratethread.php?tid=40&rating=3&my_post_key=f26656e293d81a40cc2df383de669538

Even though this has the Jew actress Rachel Weisz in it, it still is a good film. Of course Weisz or Kondracki don't dare point the finger at the Jew "Ukrainian"-Israeli mob who run the human trafficking of White sex slaves, it still is a good film that begins to open up the topic to the public whereby further investigation and questioning will no doubt begin.

Amid all the summer blockbusters about aliens, cowboys, and little blue creatures, a movie about human trafficking might seem rather out of place. But director/co-writer Larysa Kondracki’s The Whistleblower, based on a true story, isn’t just a heartrending look at young girls being forced into the sex trade; it’s a suspense-filled tale of government corruption, political intrigue, and diplomatic cover-ups.

The Whistleblower features Vanessa Redgrave, Monica Bellucci, and John Sayles favorite David Strathairn, in addition to star Rachel Weisz as Kathy Bolkovac, a Nebraska police officer and single mother who is offered a high-paying contract position as a peacekeeper in post-war Bosnia. Under the auspices of the United Nations, Kathy is assigned to monitor international law in the region, especially in regards to women. What begins as an investigation of local brothels blows up into something much bigger — with U.N. personnel complicit, and even actively involved, in trafficking young Russian, Ukrainian, and Eastern European women. When Kathy reports her disturbing findings to her superiors, she finds herself out of a job — and her life in danger.

Kathy ended up going to the British press with her story; suing the US-based private military contractor, DynCorp, over wrongful dismissal in a British court; and co-writing a book about her experience, The Whistleblower: Sex Trafficking, Military Contractors And One Woman's Fight For Justice. We caught up with the real-life Kathy Bolkovac, now 51, to talk about the film.


BASED ON THE TRUE STORY OF NEBRASKA POLICEWOMAN KATHY BOLKOVAC

[Image: Whistleblower-Kathy-Bolkovac.jpg]

Kathy Bolkovac

(on Hollywood only funding a movie if it had a Jewish heroine, of course, in it, when the real moral heroine was not a Jew, but a White woman. But that is Hollywood for you, only spending Jew bank money to glorify Jews as having the heroism that Whites do. Disgusting if you ask me. Unjust if you ask me. Untrue and fake, if you ask me. But that is what the White American public is FORCED to accept, until we WN filmmakers change that.)

Tribeca: What did you think of the casting choice of Rachel Weisz?

Kathy Bolkovac: Well, when you look at me, I’m a big, tall, powerful blonde, and she’s a petite, gorgeous woman, but she really embodied my character’s spirit. And I really appreciated that they chose such a smart actress to play me, one who also follows the issues and is very choosy about the projects she gets involved in.

Tribeca: Did you feel that the film stayed true to your life?

Kathy Bolkovac: They stayed true to my life while I was in Bosnia for the most part; they took some liberties with my personal life, which was okay. [For example, Kathy had three children, not just one daughter, as the film portrays.] They kept my personal life largely out of it, and simplified it, so they could focus on the issues they needed to focus on.

Tribeca: And what about the Ukrainian girl in the film, Raya, the one you struggle to save — was that an accurate depiction of what happened?

Kathy Bolkovac: There was a girl who was killed; there were several girls who were killed. But Raya was a composite of many girls. I was at an autopsy of a girl who was of Ukrainian descent [like the character of Raya] who had tape wrapped around her mouth and was found floating in the river.

But in real life, I didn’t develop those strong attachments to the girls; it’s something that as a police officer you can never do. That may be the one issue I take with the film, but they had to allow that to happen for the sake of getting the emotion of the story across. But in reality, I tried to separate myself from them. I had worked for 10 years previously in domestic violence and I learned that don’t attach yourself to the victim.

Tribeca: What do you hope that people who see the film take away from it?

Kathy Bolkovac: There are a lot of movies about human trafficking, but this movie is so much more than that. It talks about corruption — internal and external corruption — corporations, NGOs, and the actual dirtiness behind the scenes of trafficking and who’s really involved in it. It’s not just a story about another female victim.

Tribeca: And what about the Ukrainian girl in the film, Raya, the one you struggle to save — was that an accurate depiction of what happened?

Kathy Bolkovac: There was a girl who was killed; there were several girls who were killed. But Raya was a composite of many girls. I was at an autopsy of a girl who was of Ukrainian descent [like the character of Raya] who had tape wrapped around her mouth and was found floating in the river.

But in real life, I didn’t develop those strong attachments to the girls; it’s something that as a police officer you can never do. That may be the one issue I take with the film, but they had to allow that to happen for the sake of getting the emotion of the story across. But in reality, I tried to separate myself from them. I had worked for 10 years previously in domestic violence and I learned that don’t attach yourself to the victim.

Tribeca: What do you hope that people who see the film take away from it?

Kathy Bolkovac: There are a lot of movies about human trafficking, but this movie is so much more than that. It talks about corruption — internal and external corruption — corporations, NGOs, and the actual dirtiness behind the scenes of trafficking and who’s really involved in it. It’s not just a story about another female victim.

http://www.tribecafilm.com/news-features...HQ7gFYRgm4




Reviewer's Note: If you know any women, if you love a woman, if you have any woman in your family, this is a film which will move you and you'll never forget. It is a film about human corruption, and for that it is timeless.[/quote]

I saw this film. It was very difficult to watch, especially the White traitors to their race. A realistic film.

"It talks about corruption — internal and external corruption — corporations, NGOs, and the actual dirtiness behind the scenes of trafficking and who’s really involved in it."

She can say that again, the extremely raalistic brutality of young Ukrainin girls with Jew mafia thugs putting pistols to their heads and blowing their brains out in from of 12 screaming sex slaves almost qualifies this film for an X rating. How they treat the Ukraine girls like dogs and brutally kill them like gods in front of other Ukraine girls to shut them up. He grabs her by her blond hair, drags her across the room, puts a pistol to her skull and blows her brains out and her friends scream in terror. Pure terror. The Jew Mafia is the old NKVD in action. Treating White people like human cattle and dogs, literally.

You have to see this movie, Whistleblower.

Yes, true. It shows the moral dirtiness of those who sell out their kin to the Jew mafia.
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06-13-2014, 12:37 PM
Post: #2
RE: The Whistleblower: Film by Ukrainian about Sex Slavery
(04-04-2014 05:42 PM)Freedom_of_Speech Wrote:  From our visual arts forum I found this good review:

The Whistleblower: Film by Ukrainian about Sex Slavery


by Lisa Kondracki

http://whiteheritage.org/showthread.php?tid=63&pid=76&mode=threaded
http://www.whiteheritage.org/ratethread.php?tid=40&rating=3&my_post_key=f26656e293d81a40cc2df383de669538

Even though this has the Jew actress Rachel Weisz in it, it still is a good film. Of course Weisz or Kondracki don't dare point the finger at the Jew "Ukrainian"-Israeli mob who run the human trafficking of White sex slaves, it still is a good film that begins to open up the topic to the public whereby further investigation and questioning will no doubt begin.

Amid all the summer blockbusters about aliens, cowboys, and little blue creatures, a movie about human trafficking might seem rather out of place. But director/co-writer Larysa Kondracki’s The Whistleblower, based on a true story, isn’t just a heartrending look at young girls being forced into the sex trade; it’s a suspense-filled tale of government corruption, political intrigue, and diplomatic cover-ups.

The Whistleblower features Vanessa Redgrave, Monica Bellucci, and John Sayles favorite David Strathairn, in addition to star Rachel Weisz as Kathy Bolkovac, a Nebraska police officer and single mother who is offered a high-paying contract position as a peacekeeper in post-war Bosnia. Under the auspices of the United Nations, Kathy is assigned to monitor international law in the region, especially in regards to women. What begins as an investigation of local brothels blows up into something much bigger — with U.N. personnel complicit, and even actively involved, in trafficking young Russian, Ukrainian, and Eastern European women. When Kathy reports her disturbing findings to her superiors, she finds herself out of a job — and her life in danger.

Kathy ended up going to the British press with her story; suing the US-based private military contractor, DynCorp, over wrongful dismissal in a British court; and co-writing a book about her experience, The Whistleblower: Sex Trafficking, Military Contractors And One Woman's Fight For Justice. We caught up with the real-life Kathy Bolkovac, now 51, to talk about the film.


BASED ON THE TRUE STORY OF NEBRASKA POLICEWOMAN KATHY BOLKOVAC

[Image: Whistleblower-Kathy-Bolkovac.jpg]

Kathy Bolkovac

(on Hollywood only funding a movie if it had a Jewish heroine, of course, in it, when the real moral heroine was not a Jew, but a White woman. But that is Hollywood for you, only spending Jew bank money to glorify Jews as having the heroism that Whites do. Disgusting if you ask me. Unjust if you ask me. Untrue and fake, if you ask me. But that is what the White American public is FORCED to accept, until we WN filmmakers change that.)

Tribeca: What did you think of the casting choice of Rachel Weisz?

Kathy Bolkovac: Well, when you look at me, I’m a big, tall, powerful blonde, and she’s a petite, gorgeous woman, but she really embodied my character’s spirit. And I really appreciated that they chose such a smart actress to play me, one who also follows the issues and is very choosy about the projects she gets involved in.

Tribeca: Did you feel that the film stayed true to your life?

Kathy Bolkovac: They stayed true to my life while I was in Bosnia for the most part; they took some liberties with my personal life, which was okay. [For example, Kathy had three children, not just one daughter, as the film portrays.] They kept my personal life largely out of it, and simplified it, so they could focus on the issues they needed to focus on.

Tribeca: And what about the Ukrainian girl in the film, Raya, the one you struggle to save — was that an accurate depiction of what happened?

Kathy Bolkovac: There was a girl who was killed; there were several girls who were killed. But Raya was a composite of many girls. I was at an autopsy of a girl who was of Ukrainian descent [like the character of Raya] who had tape wrapped around her mouth and was found floating in the river.

But in real life, I didn’t develop those strong attachments to the girls; it’s something that as a police officer you can never do. That may be the one issue I take with the film, but they had to allow that to happen for the sake of getting the emotion of the story across. But in reality, I tried to separate myself from them. I had worked for 10 years previously in domestic violence and I learned that don’t attach yourself to the victim.

Tribeca: What do you hope that people who see the film take away from it?

Kathy Bolkovac: There are a lot of movies about human trafficking, but this movie is so much more than that. It talks about corruption — internal and external corruption — corporations, NGOs, and the actual dirtiness behind the scenes of trafficking and who’s really involved in it. It’s not just a story about another female victim.

Tribeca: And what about the Ukrainian girl in the film, Raya, the one you struggle to save — was that an accurate depiction of what happened?

Kathy Bolkovac: There was a girl who was killed; there were several girls who were killed. But Raya was a composite of many girls. I was at an autopsy of a girl who was of Ukrainian descent [like the character of Raya] who had tape wrapped around her mouth and was found floating in the river.

But in real life, I didn’t develop those strong attachments to the girls; it’s something that as a police officer you can never do. That may be the one issue I take with the film, but they had to allow that to happen for the sake of getting the emotion of the story across. But in reality, I tried to separate myself from them. I had worked for 10 years previously in domestic violence and I learned that don’t attach yourself to the victim.

Tribeca: What do you hope that people who see the film take away from it?

Kathy Bolkovac: There are a lot of movies about human trafficking, but this movie is so much more than that. It talks about corruption — internal and external corruption — corporations, NGOs, and the actual dirtiness behind the scenes of trafficking and who’s really involved in it. It’s not just a story about another female victim.

http://www.tribecafilm.com/news-features...HQ7gFYRgm4




Reviewer's Note: If you know any women, if you love a woman, if you have any woman in your family, this is a film which will move you and you'll never forget. It is a film about human corruption, and for that it is timeless.

I saw this film. It was very difficult to watch, especially the White traitors to their race. A realistic film.

"It talks about corruption — internal and external corruption — corporations, NGOs, and the actual dirtiness behind the scenes of trafficking and who’s really involved in it."

She can say that again, the extremely raalistic brutality of young Ukrainin girls with Jew mafia thugs putting pistols to their heads and blowing their brains out in from of 12 screaming sex slaves almost qualifies this film for an X rating. How they treat the Ukraine girls like dogs and brutally kill them like gods in front of other Ukraine girls to shut them up. He grabs her by her blond hair, drags her across the room, puts a pistol to her skull and blows her brains out and her friends scream in terror. Pure terror. The Jew Mafia is the old NKVD in action. Treating White people like human cattle and dogs, literally.

You have to see this movie, Whistleblower.

Yes, true. It shows the moral dirtiness of those who sell out their kin to the Jew mafia.
[/quote]

Good movie, if you can get past the Jew Rachel Weicz, I guess all Hollywood movies have to stick some Jew in there to be made.
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