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HUNGARY Pre-Communism: Separation of the Executive and the Judiciary
11-15-2013, 02:19 AM
Post: #1
HUNGARY Pre-Communism: Separation of the Executive and the Judiciary
HUNGARY Pre-Communism: Separation of the Executive and the Judiciary

Jews on WN forums often say Eastern Europe had no tradition of Democracy and thus liked Jewish Marxism. That is a lie.
    Among the laws that acquired constitutional force were a series of liberal statutes enacted during the 1848 Revolution; Statute XII of 1867 (enacting the Ausgleich); and further guarantees for constitutionalism, such as Statute IV of 1869, separating the executive and the judiciary; or the post-1870 statutes regulating local self-government and state administration.[1]

    Harmathy, p.4


Communism destroyed separation of Executive and Judiciary and in doing so desroyed, not preserved, European culture, the law culture.
    In 1949, with the Hungarian Working People's Party in complete control of the country, a constitution based on the "Stalin" 1936 Soviet Constitution was adopted, the party's leading role enshrined in the document. Its basic features remained in place until 1989. [2][3]

    Ludwikowski, p.31
    Harmathy, p.7


European culture, as defined by societal law, was destroyed, not preserved, by Communism.


References

[1] Harmathy, Attila (ed.). Introduction to Hungarian Law (1998), Kluwer Law International[/i], ISBN 90-411-1066-6
[2] Harmathy, p.7
[3] Ludwikowski, Rett R. Constitution-making in the Region of Former Soviet Dominance (1996), Duke University Press, ISBN 0-8223-1802-4
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