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Anti-Marxist Genocide Martyrs
11-14-2013, 08:51 PM
Post: #1
Anti-Marxist Genocide Martyrs
Vasyl Makuch: Great Hero of the White Race
Anti-Marxist Genocide Hero

Vasyl Makuch: Anti-Marxist Genocide Hero
Those That Have Given the Ultimate Sacrifice for Our Race.


Vasyl Makuch

* 14 November 1927, Kariv

† 6 November 1968, Kiev

    “Down with the Communist colonizers! Long live free Ukraine! Down with the invaders of Czechoslovakia!"

    Vasyl Makuch, 5 November 1968



[Image: 1.jpg]

Vasyl Makuch, 1962.


On 5 November 1968 ex-soldier of the Ukrainian Insurgent Army and political prisoner Vasyl Makuch (40) poured petrol over himself and set himself on fire in the main boulevard of Kiev. He did so in protest against the occupation and russification of Ukraine by the Soviet regime and against the invasion of Czechoslovakia.

Vasyl Omelyanovytch Makuch was born on 14 November 1927 in the village of Kariv, then a part of the Polish Lwów Voivodeship. He came from a patriotic family and therefore he liked the national movement and concept of free Ukraine. Under the influence of his father and their neighbours, he joined the secret service of Ukrainian Insurgent Army (UPA) in 1944. He was code-named Mykola. He was shot during a battle and captured by NKVD in February 1946. He was arrested on 15 February 1946. He underwent harsh interrogation in Lwow prison and on 11 July 1946 the military tribunal condemned him to ten years of hard labour, most of which he spent in Siberian work camps. On 18 July 1955 he was released and deported into exile.

In Siberia exile, Makuch met Lidiya Ivanivna Zapara, an actress who was sentenced to ten years of work camp and five years of exile when she was seventeen because of her participation in propaganda concerts together with her stepmother during the German occupation. They became very close. Lidiya was released two years earlier than Vasyl but they kept writing to each other. After his release on 6 April 1956, he was banned from living in western Ukraine. He left for Dnipropetrovsk and married Lidiya. Their daughter Olha was born in 1960, their son Volodymyr four years later.

Makuch initially worked in the Promcynk factory, later he made his living as a household appliances repairer. He attended evening courses, passed secondary school leaving exam and then was accepted to the Faculty of Pedagogy. However, he was expelled very soon because he did not tell the admission committee about his past imprisonment. He hoped to be allowed attending evening or distance learning courses at least but he was not. Lidiya worked as a cook. The couple decided to enrol their children to a Ukrainian kindergarten and school but the children became victims of bullying – their classmates taunted them because they spoke Ukrainian and the teachers did not take any action.

Makuch was very politically active; he often visited Lwow and Kiev and was in touch with people sharing his views. He also corresponded with his imprisoned friends. People were meeting at his place in Dnipropetrovsk to discuss possibilities of fighting for free Ukraine under the new “advanced socialism”. As he did not conceal his opinions, he attracted attention of the KGB soon. Both he and his family were under secret police surveillance.

Oles Hončar’s novel called Sobor (The Temple) that was published in the Vitčyzna (“Homeland”) magazine in January 1968 had a great impact on Makuch. He was deeply affected by subsequent smearing campaign of the press that accused its author of nationalism. Similarly, he did not like the occupation of the Czechoslovakia by the troops of five member countries of the Warsaw Pact that started on 21 August 1968.

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Vasyl Makuch and his family.

In reaction to the occupation, he told his wife he was ready to sacrifice himself for free Ukraine and the future of their children.

In October 1968 Makuch took a few days off and went to visit his sister in Kariv. When leaving, he said to his wife and children: “If anything happens to me, be sure I love you all very much.” From his parents’ place, he sent several letters to his friends in Nikopol, Kiev and Dnipropetrovsk and two more letters to his wife, all of them ending with “Vivat Ukraine!”.

On 5 November 1968, Makuch poured petrol over himself and set himself on fire in the Chreshchatyk Street at the entrance of building No. 27, near the Bessarabia Market. Then he ran towards the today’s Independence Square, screaming: “Down with the Communist colonizers! Long live free Ukraine! Down with the invaders of Czechoslovakia!” There were many people around, running away. There were also a large number of police officers who were trying to smother him. The burned man was transferred in coma to hospital where he died the following day of severe burns covering 70% of his body.

Secret police officers contacted Makuch’s wife and told her that her husband was very ill. Lidiya arrived to Kiev on 6 November 1968 together with her godfather Ivan Cypuch. Both of them were arrested immediately upon their arrival. According to her testimony, they were kept in a cold room all night and brought to the morgue the following morning. The prosecution office in Kiev started criminal proceedings on the merits of Vasyl Makuch’s suicide the same day.

Lidiya and her godfather were closely watched, they were not allowed to speak with anyone. Their relatives living in western Ukraine wanted to have Vasyl buried there but Lidiya wanted to have him close to her and their children. Finally, he was buried in Dnipropetrovsk. The funeral took place under the KGB supervision. All people who attended the funeral were photographed and checked. Lidiya was invited to an interrogation several times during the following three months. KGB officers kept asking about Makuch – who was he meeting, what was he saying etc. Lidiya lost her job because of them and could not find a new one for several years. The family merely scraped along. To keep her children, she had to sell all her belongings. Finally she found a job in a cafeteria at the railway station.

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Lidiya Zapara, daughter Olha, Vasyl Makuch, 1962.

Makuch’s sister Paraska Osmylovska was also interrogated – on 7 November 1968 she was summoned to the local and then to the regional KGB department in Sokalo. The investigating officers believed that Makuch’s suicide was part of some bigger plan of an illegal organization and did not hesitate to use violence in order to find out the truth. Osmylovska’s husband confirmed that she injured her lungs, spitted blood and died after two years as a consequence of the interrogations.

The Ukrainian media did not report on the self-immolation of Vasyl Makuch at all. However, thanks to the Ukrainian dissent, foreign media could broadcast the following information on 5 November 1968: „Ukrainian citizen Vasyl Makuch set himself on fire in protest against the Communist regime, oppression of the Ukrainian people and Soviet aggression against Czechoslovakia. The whole international community bows to this unprecedented and heroic act.”

However, Makuch’s act did not stay without any response. Yevhen Pronyuk wrote an anonymous article called In Memory of a Hero which circulated among the Ukrainians as a samizdat. It led to further repressions. Bohdan Czaban and Stefan Bedrylo (arrested in Mordvin camps for two years) were arrested and imprisoned because of dissemination of this article.

Moreover, Makuch was not the only Ukrainian who chose self-immolation as a radical form of his protest. Ex-soldier Mykola Bereslavskyj tried to self-immolate in February 1969 in the very same street as Makuch. He just called “Long live free Ukraine!” and “Stop discriminating the Ukrainian people!” and then he was arrested and later imprisoned for two and a half years. On 21 January 1978, sixty years after declaration of the Ukrainian National Republic, Oleksa Hirnyk set himself on fire in Kaniv, near the grave of Taras Shevchenko. In his leaflets, he called on the Ukrainians to rise up against the Russian occupation and russification.

However, more than fifty years later, not many people know now about Makuch’s protest, even in Ukraine. Nothing remembers his self-immolation in the Chreshchatyk Street. In 2006, the Dnipropetrovsk regional organization of the Ukrainian Association of Political Prisoners and the Persecuted asked President Viktor Yushchenko to award Makuch the title of the Ukrainian Hero in memoriam but the President did not react to this appeal at all.

On 5 November 2008, the 40th anniversary of Vasyl Makuch’s self-immolation, a memorial concert was held at the Independence Square. On the very same day, the Torch Museum was opened in the main office of the Chernobyl-Help NGO in Donetsk in memory of Makuch and Hirnyk.

In October 2011, Kiev youth movement presented the book called Bilja vytokiv nezaležnosti („Roots of Independence”). The book contains biographies of 20 individuals associated with the fight for Ukrainian freedom and restoration. Vasyl Makuch is among them.

In the evening of 5 November 2011, several people gathered at the place of Makuch’s self-immolation. They brought his portrait and formed his name from candles. Arsen Pushkarenko, leader of the Patriots youth organization and student of Kiev National University, suggested contacting the Czech and Slovak governments and ask them for recognition and honouring of Makuch’s act. „The Ukrainian authorities should be ashamed.” [1]



Great Heroes of the White Race.

.
____________________________________________


References

[1] janpalach.cz, Living Torches, http://whiteheritage.org/showthread.php?tid=470&pid=1123&mode=threaded


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11-14-2013, 09:22 PM
Post: #2
RE: Anti-Marxist Genocide Martyrs
Sándor Bauer: Great Hero of the White Race
Anti-Marxist Genocide Hero. Those That Have Given the Ultimate Sacrifice for Our Race.


Sándor Bauer


* 21 February 1952, Budapest

† 23 January 1969, Budapest

To my parents: My dear mother and father.If I have ever been an ungrateful son, I ask for your forgiveness. I wish to live on, but the nation and the proletariat need my body, burnt to coal.Dear grandma, my beloved uncles and cousins, I send you all millions of kisses.Sanyi

ZP_BAUER_AUTOR


[Image: 1.jpg]


On 20 January 1969, Sándor Bauer, a sixteen year-old student, poured petrol over himself and lit himself on fire on the steps of the National Museum in Budapest. He did it in support of Jan Palach's act and in protest to the occupation of Czechoslovakia and the presence of the Soviet army in Hungary.

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Sándor Bauer was born on 21 February 1952 in, the capital of Hungary. He was named after his step-brother, who had been dragged away by the Soviet army at the end of WW2 and had never again been seen by his family. In 1956, Soviet tanks shelled the Bauer family's flat at the time. For political reasons, Sándor could not attend a specialized forestry high-school and studied in the end to be a car mechanic.

He was an avid reader and enjoyed discussing politics with friends. According to János M. Rainer, a Hungarian historian who researched Bauer's protest in the archives, Sándor had an “unbalanced personality and a strong interest in the Hungarian nation and its independence.” Jan Palach’s self-immolation had a direct influence on his decision to imitate the act, as is known from a note addressed to his classmates. The note suggests that he considered himself a Leninist, perceiving the then Soviet regime as a twisted representation of the communist ideal. He wrote a second note to his closest relatives, asking them for forgiveness. The place he chose carried the same symbolic significance as Palach's place of self-immolation – the steps in front of the Museum in downtown Budapest.

Police records state that, on 20 January 1969 at 1 p.m., he poured petrol over himself and lit himself on fire at the entrance of the museum, near a plaque dedicated to the Hungarian poet, Sándor Petöfi. Holding two Hungarian flags and running down the steps, he chanted various political slogans. Several passers-by, seeing a young man whose clothing was entirely on fire, chased after him and managed to put the fire out with their coats. According to an eyewitness, Bauer refused medical treatment and talked about the reasons that had immolated himself. He also mentioned “a Czech brother who did the same.” A crowd of around 200 to 300 people formed around the scene. At 1:20 p.m., an ambulance called by a policeman came.

Bauer, who had severe burns, was taken to a military hospital, where he was questioned by intelligence officers. On 22 January 1969, he declared that his act had been a protest against the Soviet occupation of Hungary and was immediately arrested in spite of still being in hospital. A day later, he died. The intelligence services forced Bauer’s parents to bury him quietly on 28 January 1969 and proceeded to carry out an intensive investigation of his friends, two of which were being prosecuted up until March 1969 for not having reported a crime. Bauer's personal possessions, diary, and suicide notes were confiscated. On 22 January 1969, the Hungarian press agency published a short press release stating that Bauer had had a psychological illness and that his act had not been related to politics. Using the agency’s information, the Czechoslovak media briefly commented on the case as well.

[Image: 3.jpg]

Sándor Bauer’s plaque on the steps of the National Museum in Budapest (photo taken by Petr Blažek on 5 March 2009)

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In Hungary, Sándor Bauer's act remained a public taboo until the end of the 1980s, by which time it had almost been forgotten. It was not until 1989 that the director, Zsolt Balogh, made a docudrama about him, in which he used the testimonies of eye-witnesses and Bauer’s friends. In 2001, a plaque was mounted on the place of his tragic protest, and in 2011, one Budapest street was named after him.


Great Heroes of the White Race.

.
______________________________________


References

[1] janpalach.cz, Living Torches, http://www.whiteheritage.org/usercp2.php?action=addsubscription&tid=149&my_post_key=f26656e293d81a40cc2df383de669538
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11-14-2013, 09:57 PM
Post: #3
RE: Anti-Marxist Genocide Martyrs
Josef Hlavatý: Great Hero of the White Race
Anti-Marxist Genocide Hero. Those That Have Given the Ultimate Sacrifice for Our Race.


Josef Hlavatý

Josef Hlavatý

* 4 December 1943, Křimice

† 25 January 1969, Pilsen

    “His state of health is critical. During his transportation to the hospital, Mr. Hlavatý did not tell anything except his name and address. When the doctor asked for reasons of his act, he said it was a protest against the Russians because he did not like them.”

    From a VB contingency report, 21 January 1969




On 20 January 1969, Josef Hlavatý (25, blue-collar worker) poured himself with kerosene and set himself on fire. Five days later, Jan Palach’s first follower died in hospital.

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Josef Hlavatý. (Source: ABS)

From 16 to 31 January 1969, a relevant Czech report lists ten attempts of self-immolation, two of which ended in death. One of them was Jan Palach, the other was Josef Hlavatý who set himself on fire on 20 September 1969 around 8 p.m. at the Dukelské Square (today’s T. G. Masaryk Square) in Pilsen, near Czechoslovak State Bank. A few passers-by smothered the burning man and called for an ambulance. It was a symbolic place – there used to be a First Republic memorial of National Liberation with the statue of Masaryk, Czechoslovak’s first president (restored after 1989).

Several people stayed at the venue and others kept coming to discuss the event. In the end, there were about 150 of them.

[Image: 3.jpg]


[Image: 4.jpg]


Someone brought Czechoslovak flag and placed a crown of thorns on it, someone else brought Jan Palach’s photo from newspapers and people put lighted candles around it.
[Image: 5.jpg]



At the very same evening, general public found out about Hlavatý’s act because then-President Ludvík Svoboda mentioned it in his live and very emotional TV interview, asking young people not to follow Palach’s self-immolating example. A visibly shocked politician said: “I have just heard that another young man attempted to kill himself in a similar way.” Svoboda feared that Hlavatý might be a member of Palach’s group but this concern was not fulfilled. On the following day, radio and television informed that Josef Hlavatý was an alcoholic who set himself on fire because of his private life problems and that the event cannot be linked with Jan Palach because they had not even known each other. An article in Rudé právo daily written in a similar way with reference to the Ministry of Interior followed.

According to archived investigation documents, Josef Hlavatý was most probably a young man with serious personal problems. He grew in a family of an ex-warden from Bory prison. He was learning founder but he was expelled from the school because of his problems with alcohol and too many missed classes. He changed several jobs before working as a worker in Pilsner brewery. He married in 1964 and had two children but the marriage was unhappy and after four years, his wife filed a petition for divorce. They were divorced on 9 January 1969, less than two weeks before his self-immolation. Investigators found out he took it hard, especially because of his children who were entrusted into the care of his ex-wife. She and some of his friends testified that he mentioned suicide several times.

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Hlavatý’s ex-wife also told that he had not been interested in politics but other testimonies indicated the opposite. The investigation report says: “He was very active during the August 1968 events. He was dwelling at the building of the Czechoslovak Radio in Pilsen and participated in acts of sabotage, such as removing of street signs and writing of anti-Soviet slogans. From that moment, he started to have hostile approach towards USSR even thought he (like his parents) used to be a supporter of its politics. He was more pensive during his last days but it is not known whether it was because of his divorce or Palach’s self-immolation. However, he never mentioned this act to his family nor friends.”

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On the ill-fated day, Josef Hlavatý went to Lidový dům restaurant where he drank a few beers. Around 7 p.m. he went to his parents’ house where he took a bottle of kerosene and headed for the nearby Dukelské Square where he set himself on fire. Afterwards he was brought severely burned to the military hospital in Pilsen. He suffered third-degree burns on his face, chest and stomach and second-degree burns on his backs and head. He died in hospital on 25 January 1969. As his act was challenged, he had a silent funeral.





Great Heroes of the White Race.

.
______________________________________


References

[1] janpalach.cz, Living Torches, http://www.janpalach.cz/en/default/zive-...ne/hlavaty


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11-14-2013, 10:01 PM
Post: #4
RE: Anti-Marxist Genocide Martyrs
Jan Zajíc: Great Hero of the White Race
Anti-Marxist Genocide Hero. Those That Have Given the Ultimate Sacrifice for Our Race.


Jan Zajíc
Jan Zajíc

* 3July 1950, Vítkov, Czech Republic

† 25 February 1969, Prague, Czech Republic

    “Capricious afternoon. /More than Prometheus is being carried around. /Eyes are a broken dam. / I am weeping – in the rain – on the pavement. / For everything. / For the twenty-one years, / for the spring blossom the soldiers killed / for the person who refused to go back, / (…) It is January 1969.”

    Jan Zajíc, from a poem To Jan Palach



[Image: 1.jpg]


On 25 February 1969, Jan Zajíc, a student from a technical school in Šumperk, Northern Moravia, Czech Republic, doused himself with petrol and set himself on fire in one of the houses on Wenceslas square in Prague. He consciously followed up on the self-immolation of Jan Palach a month earlier. He failed to run out of the building and died on the spot.

The parents of Jan Zajíc came to Vítkov, a town of several thousand inhabitants in Northern Moravia, as displaced persons after the Second World War. His father was a salesman and his mother became a teacher in the local primary school. Jan Zajíc was their second child – he had an older brother and a younger sister. Family documents tell us that “his father was rather liberal whereas his mother was bringing up the children according to the traditional Christian education.” Zajíc was even baptised.

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Jan Zajíc finished elementary school in Vítkov, and in 1965, he started to study at a technical school in Šumperk. The choice of a vocational school was driven by his father’s illness – the family wanted the young man to be able to earn his living as soon as possible. The January 1968 came two years later bringing the final phase of the Prague spring. Jan Zajíc, as well as his schoolmates, were interested in the political situation and took part in public debates. According to witnesses, he excelled over other students in political knowledge. After the Soviet invasion on 21 August 1968, he joined the resistance movement against the occupation forces in Vítkov. He refused to emigrate, even though his father proposed it both to him and his brother.

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After Jan Palach’s death, Zajíc left Šumperk for Prague to participate in a hunger strike undertook by a group of students and young people. The strike took place under the ramp of the National Museum on Wenceslas Square. On 25 January, he and his classmates from Šumperk watched the Palach’s funeral procession in Pařížská Street. The few days stay in Prague would become for Zajíc, a young person from a rather marginal part of the country, the main impulse to start thinking about suicide with a political motive. Zajíc expected that another university student would, on the basis of the declaration in Palach’s letter, decide to commit suicide, but no one did, and so he himself started getting ready for this act about a week in advance.

He left for Prague in the morning of 25 February 1969. Even though three of his classmates were travelling with him for different reasons and the police knew about his intention, no one succeeded in preventing Zajíc from committing suicide. At about 1:30 p.m., he doused himself with petrol and set himself on fire in house number 39 on Wenceslas square in Prague. He died directly on the spot after having failed to run out of the building.

[Image: 5.jpg]


He left there a list of his followers and a declaration called “Citizens of the Czechoslovak Republic”: “In spite of what Jan Palach did, our life is returning to its old ways” he writes, “and that is why I decided to wake up your consciousness as torch number 2. I am not doing it to be mourned, to become famous or because I am crazy. I decided to immolate myself so that you will really pull yourselves together and will not let yourselves be oppressed by several dictators! Remember: ‘When the water level rises above someone’s head, it is not important how high it is’ (...) Let my torch light the way towards the free and happy Czechoslovakia. (...) Only through this I will still be alive.”

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The funeral of Jan Zajíc was held in Vítkov on Saturday 2 March 1969. About eight thousand people came to honour his memory. The response to his act is much lower than in the case of Jan Palach. Yet the general public was aware both of Zajíc’s suicide and of its political motives. After Zajíc’s death, his family went through many difficulties caused by his suicide. His mother lost her job at school, and his father was expelled from the Communist party. Zajíc’s suicide also brought about political problems both for his brother and sister at university entrance exams and during their studies.

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Today, Zajíc’s memory is commemorated mainly by the Jan Zajíc Prize Endowment Fund in Vítkov. It grants prizes to the most successful elementary and high school students of the region. The prize granting is an important cultural event in the region. In 1991, Jan Zajíc was posthumously awarded the Order of Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, First Rank. One year later, his story was made into a famous television film called Jan.




Great Heroes of the White Race.

.
______________________________________


References

[1] janpalach.cz, Living Torches, http://www.whiteheritage.org/showthread.php?tid=507&pid=1990


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11-14-2013, 10:20 PM
Post: #5
RE: Anti-Marxist Genocide Martyrs
Oskar Brüsewitz: Great Hero of the White Race
Anti-Marxist Genocide Hero. Those That Have Given the Ultimate Sacrifice for Our Race.


Oskar Brüsewitz

* 30 May 1929, Vilkyškiai

† 22 August 1976, Halle

    “A radiogram for everyone, a radiogram for everyone, the church in the GDR accuses communism of oppressing children and the youth at school.”

    Oskar Brüsewitz, 18 August 1976


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On 18 August 1976, Oskar Brüsewitz, an evangelical pastor, poured petrol over himself and lit himself on fire to protest against the oppression of Christians in the GDR and against the collaboration of prominent officials in the church with the state authoritites.

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On 18 August 1976, Oskar Brüsewitz, an evangelical pastor, poured petrol over himself and lit himself on fire to protest against the oppression of Christians in the GDR and against the collaboration of prominent officials in the church with the state authoritites.

[Image: 3.jpg]


Oskar Brüsewitz was born on 30 May 1929 to a Lithuanian ecumenical family. His childhood, as well as those of his three siblings, was influenced by the Christian environment surrounding them; Oskar was particularly inspired by his father’s evangelical faith. He received his basic education between 1935 and 1943 and then continued to be trained as a merchant. When he was sixteen, however, he was drafted into the Wehrmacht and spent the rest of the war fighting the Red Army in Warsaw, Lithuania, and East Prussia as a panzerfaust operator. In the autumn of 1945, he returned from war captivity, received training as a shoemaker in Osnabrück, and two years later, settled in West Germany with his family. In 1949, he opened his own business as a children’s shoemaker. In 1951, he got a divorce, and three years later, moved to East Germany> where he remarried in 1955. Later he lived in Weiβensee, Thuringia. It was then that he discovered his profound interest in theology; however health problems forced him to end his studies at the Lutheran seminary in Wittenberg after just a few weeks.

In 1963, his small shoemaker business was turned into a cooperative enterprise, where he briefly worked as a department manager. A year later, he began studying at the Erfurt Lutheran seminary, successfully graduating in 1969. He started off as a second pastor in the small town of Droβdorf-Rippicha in the Zeitz region. He became the town’s pastor in late 1970 and remained in the position until August 1976. Brüsewitz organized radical events against the forced atheisation of society and worked systematically and innovatively with the youth. This irritated the Stasi, who had followed him since the 1950s and labelled him as “a militant pastor.” It also irritated the church officials, who, according to Brüsewitz, failed to react adequately to the communist party’s anti-church policies. In 1975, the pastor received considerable attention because of his reaction to the Party slogan: “Without God and without sun, we will get the harvest done. Brüsewitz displayed a sign reading “Without Sun and without God, the whole world is going to go bankrupt” on his horse buggy and set off for Zeitz, where he caused a traffic jam.

The state apparatus exerted increasingly intensive pressure on Brüsewitz’s superiors. The church began to talk about transferring him and conducting an inspection of his activities. At that time, Brüsewitz was actively researching medical information on the effects of self-immolation. In the summer of 1976, he decided to commit an act that would permanently change many pastors’ and believers’ views of the position of the evangelical church in the GDR. On 18 August, he ate breakfast with his family, listened to his daughter play his favourite piano composition, and hugged his wife. Then he drove to Zeitz, where he arrived shortly after 10 a.m. He stopped in front of the church close to a pedestrian zone in the very centre of the town and spread a banner across his car that read “A radiogram for everyone, a radiogram for everyone, the church in the GDR accuses communism of oppressing children and the youth at school.” He then poured petrol over himself and set himself on fire. Even though the flames were put out by people passing by after a few minutes, he condition was severe. Four days later, on 22 August, Oskar Brüsewitz died, before the Stasi had allowed his wife to see him.

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Oskar Brüsewitz’s life story is a classic example of a clash with totalitarian power that feels threatened because its power monopoly is being questioned. Oskar Brüsewitz’s story also proves that the need to protect one’s moral integrity may lead to committing an act that favours integrity over physical existence. The East German society’s reaction to the pastor’s death was not as massive as the reaction of the Czechoslovak people to the death of Jan Palach, yet his sacrifice is still of extraordinary importance. Many people came to the realisation that they could not continue to succumb to the authorities’ pressure, and they began to actively support the church’s unofficial activities.

Ehrhart Neubert, a German historian, rightfully classified Oskar Brüsewitz’s self-immolation as “one of the most relevant events in the history of the East German resistance”.






Great Heroes of the White Race.

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______________________________________


References

[1] janpalach.cz, Living Torches, http://www.janpalach.cz/en/default/zive-.../brusewitz


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11-14-2013, 10:24 PM
Post: #6
RE: Anti-Marxist Genocide Martyrs
Romas Kalanta: Great Hero of the White Race
Anti-Marxist Genocide Hero. Those That Have Given the Ultimate Sacrifice for Our Race.


Romas Kalanta

Romas Kalanta

* 22 February 1953, Alytus, Lithuania

† 15 May 1972, Kaunas, Lithuania

„Please accuse the totalitarian regime of causing my death”

Romas Kalanta, 14 May 1972

    "Please accuse the totalitarian regime of causing my death”

    Romas Kalanta, 14 May 1972


[Image: 1jpg]

On 14 May 1972, a nineteen-year-old worker, Romas Kalanta, poured petrol on himself and set himself on fire to protest against the Soviet occupation of Lithuania.

Romas Kalanta was born on 22 February 1953 to a working-class family. His father was a Second World War veteran, a communist, and a supporter of the Soviet regime. On the contrary, his mother was religious and brought up her children in the Catholic tradition. Romas attended secondary school in Kaunas. He was enjoyed reading novels, writing poetry, playing the guitar, and together with his friends, he admired the Hippies movement which met with a relatively big response among young Lithuanians. He also liked drawing, and motifs containing crosses, fire and suffering people often appeared in his pictures.

In 1971, Kalanta had a conflict with the governing board of the secondary school, because he criticised Marxism in his history class presentation. He was also considering joining the Catholic seminary in Kaunas. Finally, he was expelled from the Young Communist League, and after not having passed the graduation exam, he switched to evening classes and started working in a factory.

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Kalanta was probably inspired to commit self-immolation by the act of Jan Palach, which was known in Lithuania thanks to international radio broadcasting. On 14 May 1972 at 12:30 p.m., Kalanta came to the main avenue Laisves Aleja (Liberty Boulevard, Kaunas) where the local youth used to gather near the fountain. The fountain was situated in front of the State Music Theatre and opposite the main building of the Soviet government in the city. Kalanta brought with him a three-litre bottle of petrol, poured it over himself, and set himself on fire. According to some witnesses, he shouted: “Freedom for Lithuania!” Near the fountain, a notebook was found with the following message: “Please accuse the totalitarian regime of causing my death.” Kalanta suffered burns on 90 per cent of his body. He was taken to the hospital unconscious and died the next day.

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The authorities forced the family to begin the funeral ceremony two hours earlier than had been originally announced (tombstone gravestone was not allowed until 1982). This caused a wave of indignation among the youth. The funeral procession grew into anti-Soviet street riots that went on for two days and had to be violently suppressed. In total, 402 people were arrested; later on, seven of them were sentenced to three years’ imprisonment without probation for “hooliganism”. Hundreds of others were expelled from schools or dismissed from their jobs. According to the final report of the Vilnius Committee for State Security, 13 more people from Lithuania followed Kalanta’s example and committed self-immolation in the upcoming months.

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In June 1972, the Lithuanian press published a report issued by an alleged medical commission declaring Kalanta mentally ill. He was even given back his membership in the Young Communist League. It was only in 1989 that a new medical commission was set up on the basis of the state prosecution decision presenting a contrary conclusion. It claimed that Kalanta was sane before committing the act, and therefore, it was not possible to consider him mentally ill. Several books were written about his act, and in 1999, a documentary film on these events was made. On 4 July 2000, Kalanta was posthumously honoured by Lithuanian president Valdas Adamkus. On 14 May 2002, a monument was placed on the site of his tragic protest.

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Great Heroes of the White Race.

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References

[1] janpalach.cz, Living Torches, http://www.janpalach.cz/en/default/zive-...ne/kalanta


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