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Marta Kubisova: Music banned by Jew Marxism
11-08-2013, 07:01 PM
Post: #1
Marta Kubisova: Music banned by Jew Marxism
Marta Kubisova: Music banned by Jew Marxism


Marta Kubisova, who by 1967 had become the most popular female performer in Czechoslovakia, both as a solo artist, and as one of the Golden Kids, alongside Vaclav Neckar (who some of you may know as an actor, for his role in Jiri Menzel’s film Closely Observed Trains) and Helena Vondrackova. Kubisova’s versatility was extraordinary – she sang jazz, ballads, show tunes, covers, beat, soul and much else besides, but she is at her best on the material she began recording around 1966/7, with its blend of deep melodies, heavy drums, fuzz guitars and soulful horns, creating a hybrid that sounds unlike anything else being made at the time, in Czechoslovakia or elsewhere. To get an idea of her range, the next clip – never released on vinyl, having been recorded for Czech TV in 1967 or 68 – shows her merging dark balladry and frothy Nancy Sinatra-style showbiz almost seamlessly.


[Image: otto_dlabola_31.jpg?w=213&h=300]


[Play clip, Marta Kubisova: Ale a Musim Jit, from Pribeh DVD]


The title translates roughly as ‘But I Have To Go’, and while any subtext is oblique in this instance, much else in Kubisova’s work at this point could be taken – and often was taken – as directly political. During the 1968 invasion, she went underground, performing on illegal radio broadcasts, and had already made a point of meeting Alexander Dubcek , surrounded by cameras, publicly declaring her support for him. She released a song – Modlitba Pro Martu (Prayer for Marta) that spoke of a government being stolen. Tajga Blues ’69 referenced the arctic region – known as the place to which Soviet dissidents were sent into exile – and uses a richly layered imagery of ‘guards’, ‘wolves’ and ‘long night’ to express the idea of awaiting release. By 1969, knowing the ban was coming, she instructed her sound engineers to cut the tape short on a late recording session, for a song titled Tys bejval mámin hodnej syn (You Were Once A Good Mother’s Son), allowing the brassy melody to fall into silence before it ended. The abrupt conclusion of the single released in 1970 is deeply symbolic.


For around a year after the invasion, Kubisova recorded and released records that were almost instantly withdrawn from circulation (suggesting a delayed shift in official policy, perhaps even a struggle for autonomy between the State label and the authorities in the immediate aftermath) before, in 1970, being banned outright from performing or recording. Not on political grounds, but on the pretext of falsely planted press stories about involvement in sexual scandals and pornographic films: a classic smear to thinly veil the real reason for the ban. Until 1989, she remained a dissident – a friend of Havel and key signatory of the first Charter 77 document. When the Velvet Revolution did arrive, she was sent for, and brought to the balcony to sing to the crowds in Wencelas Square. Her records were almost immediately reissued, and concerts followed. The only mystery is why it’s taken another 20 years from that point for her 60s material – at its best, some of the finest recorded anywhere – to find its way to the West: the first collection of her work to be released outside Czechoslovakia since the 1960s appeared on a Spanish independent label in 2009.

Kubisova was banned outright. [1]


The fall of Communism after 1989 saw Kubisova’s previously banned songs, the Ulrychovis’ unreleased Odyssea LP and material by many others - like The Rebels, Olympic and Prenosilova herself - reissued and rediscovered in their own countries.

Marta Kubišová is a Czech singer of iconic significance. Born in 1942, she gained notoriety during the Prague Spring of 1968 and was banned from performing in Czechoslovakia until 1990. She was a signatory of Charter 77 proclamation. During the Prague Spring, she recorded over 200 SP records and one LP, Songy a Balady (1969), which was immediately banned from stores. On 1 June 1979, she gave birth to her daughter Kateřina. On 10 December 1988 after a long absence from the public eye, she appeared at a demonstration on the 40th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, during which she sang the Czechoslovak national anthem.

On 22 November 1989, during the Velvet Revolution, she sang her "Prayer for Martha" and the Czechoslovak national anthem from a balcony on Wenceslas Square. [2][3][4]


References


[1] Communist Rock’n’Roll | Eastern Bloc Songs
[2] Milan, Hlavsa; Pelc, Jan (2001). Bez ohňů je underground. Praha: Maťa. ISBN 80-7287-020-3.
[3] Mareček, Luboš (8 November 2009). "Marta Kubišová v Brně ukázala, že je ikona nejen na parádu" (in Czech). Mladá fronta DNES.
[4] Jan Sedmidubský: Husáku, proč? Příběh Marty Kubišové, Český rozhlas. In: Téma: Ozvěny normalizace. 40.–42. minuta. 29 July 2007 (repríza
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11-08-2013, 07:02 PM
Post: #2
RE: Marta Kubisova: Music banned by Jew Marxism
WH Foki WNmedia Marta Kubasova pics



Tell a Czech that European culture, music, was not banned. Communism banned popular European music in Eastern Europe. Marta Kubisova, Czechosolovakia's most popular singer. Banned.
[center]

[Image: _vyr_4639LPdesky071.jpg]


[Image: marta-c1968-f182.jpg]


[Image: 11852159.jpg]


[Image: 1968a.jpg]

[Image: 1968c.jpg]


[Image: Obalka_magazinu_PAS.jpg]

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Marta is back... 21 November 1989
1989 when Communism fell in Czechoslovakia

[Image: JB2e974d_kubis1989.jpg]

Marta Kubisova filled Prague with lovers of music.

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Marta is back, 1989

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Several thousands more than on a Tina Turner concert... It is very hard to hold back tears when you see the video with Marta's very first performance after 19 years of silence...[2]


[/center]

European music was banned in Communist Eastern Europe. Only Jew Marxist approved "music" was allowed.


References


[1] Zpravy, idines, Kubišová: Z listopadu 1989 se mi vybaví hlavně obrovská zima 21. října 2009
http://zpravy.idnes.cz/kubisova-z-listop...domaci_klu

[2]http://www.raffem.com/MartaKubisovaNy.htm

[3]kubisova.cz, biografie, 1967-1970

http://whiteheritage.org/misc.php?action=markread&fid=5
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11-15-2013, 09:07 PM
Post: #3
RE: Marta Kubisova: Music banned by Jew Marxism
A very interesting article, well researched.
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01-28-2014, 07:47 PM
Post: #4
RE: Marta Kubisova: Music banned by Jew Marxism
(11-08-2013 07:01 PM)WNmedia Wrote:  Marta Kubisova: Music banned by Jew Marxism


Marta Kubisova, who by 1967 had become the most popular female performer in Czechoslovakia, both as a solo artist, and as one of the Golden Kids, alongside Vaclav Neckar (who some of you may know as an actor, for his role in Jiri Menzel’s film Closely Observed Trains) and Helena Vondrackova. Kubisova’s versatility was extraordinary – she sang jazz, ballads, show tunes, covers, beat, soul and much else besides, but she is at her best on the material she began recording around 1966/7, with its blend of deep melodies, heavy drums, fuzz guitars and soulful horns, creating a hybrid that sounds unlike anything else being made at the time, in Czechoslovakia or elsewhere. To get an idea of her range, the next clip – never released on vinyl, having been recorded for Czech TV in 1967 or 68 – shows her merging dark balladry and frothy Nancy Sinatra-style showbiz almost seamlessly.


[Image: otto_dlabola_31.jpg?w=213&h=300]


[Play clip, Marta Kubisova: Ale a Musim Jit, from Pribeh DVD]


The title translates roughly as ‘But I Have To Go’, and while any subtext is oblique in this instance, much else in Kubisova’s work at this point could be taken – and often was taken – as directly political. During the 1968 invasion, she went underground, performing on illegal radio broadcasts, and had already made a point of meeting Alexander Dubcek , surrounded by cameras, publicly declaring her support for him. She released a song – Modlitba Pro Martu (Prayer for Marta) that spoke of a government being stolen. Tajga Blues ’69 referenced the arctic region – known as the place to which Soviet dissidents were sent into exile – and uses a richly layered imagery of ‘guards’, ‘wolves’ and ‘long night’ to express the idea of awaiting release. By 1969, knowing the ban was coming, she instructed her sound engineers to cut the tape short on a late recording session, for a song titled Tys bejval mámin hodnej syn (You Were Once A Good Mother’s Son), allowing the brassy melody to fall into silence before it ended. The abrupt conclusion of the single released in 1970 is deeply symbolic.


For around a year after the invasion, Kubisova recorded and released records that were almost instantly withdrawn from circulation (suggesting a delayed shift in official policy, perhaps even a struggle for autonomy between the State label and the authorities in the immediate aftermath) before, in 1970, being banned outright from performing or recording. Not on political grounds, but on the pretext of falsely planted press stories about involvement in sexual scandals and pornographic films: a classic smear to thinly veil the real reason for the ban. Until 1989, she remained a dissident – a friend of Havel and key signatory of the first Charter 77 document. When the Velvet Revolution did arrive, she was sent for, and brought to the balcony to sing to the crowds in Wencelas Square. Her records were almost immediately reissued, and concerts followed. The only mystery is why it’s taken another 20 years from that point for her 60s material – at its best, some of the finest recorded anywhere – to find its way to the West: the first collection of her work to be released outside Czechoslovakia since the 1960s appeared on a Spanish independent label in 2009.

Kubisova was banned outright. [1]


The fall of Communism after 1989 saw Kubisova’s previously banned songs, the Ulrychovis’ unreleased Odyssea LP and material by many others - like The Rebels, Olympic and Prenosilova herself - reissued and rediscovered in their own countries.

Marta Kubišová is a Czech singer of iconic significance. Born in 1942, she gained notoriety during the Prague Spring of 1968 and was banned from performing in Czechoslovakia until 1990. She was a signatory of Charter 77 proclamation. During the Prague Spring, she recorded over 200 SP records and one LP, Songy a Balady (1969), which was immediately banned from stores. On 1 June 1979, she gave birth to her daughter Kateřina. On 10 December 1988 after a long absence from the public eye, she appeared at a demonstration on the 40th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, during which she sang the Czechoslovak national anthem.

On 22 November 1989, during the Velvet Revolution, she sang her "Prayer for Martha" and the Czechoslovak national anthem from a balcony on Wenceslas Square. [2][3][4]


References


[1] Communist Rock’n’Roll | Eastern Bloc Songs
[2] Milan, Hlavsa; Pelc, Jan (2001). Bez ohňů je underground. Praha: Maťa. ISBN 80-7287-020-3.
[3] Mareček, Luboš (8 November 2009). "Marta Kubišová v Brně ukázala, že je ikona nejen na parádu" (in Czech). Mladá fronta DNES.
[4] Jan Sedmidubský: Husáku, proč? Příběh Marty Kubišové, Český rozhlas. In: Téma: Ozvěny normalizace. 40.–42. minuta. 29 July 2007 (repríza

The great Marta. Our parents used to hand us down rare recordings of her music. The Jew Communists hated her music.

[color=#0000CD][size=x-large][font=Times New Roman]Svoboda[/font][/size][/color]
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